UK

Sharing Road Space: Drivers and Cyclists as Equal Road Users

Publisher: 
Scottish Executive Central Research Unit
Publication date: 
January 2001
Abstract: 

The Government has made a commitment to sustainable transport as part of an integrated transport strategy, encouraging a decrease in the use of cars and increasing the use of cycling as a viable mode of transport. As one element of their transportation policies, local authorities are expected to produce local cycling strategies which include the implementation of improvements to infrastructure and the initiation of traffic management measures.

The Little Book of Highway Defects

Publisher: 
Oxfordshire County Council
Publication date: 
November 2013
Abstract: 

The primary purpose of this manual is to provide a pictorial reference guide to describing common highway defects - some of which my prove to be a safety hazard to the road network user. Reference to this manual will help to ensure that defect identification is conducted in an accurate and consistent manner. 

The Little Book of Highway Defects

Publisher: 
Oxfordshire County Council
Publication date: 
November 2013
Abstract: 

The primary purpose of this manual is to provide a pictorial reference guide to describing common highway defects - some of which my prove to be a safety hazard to the road network user. Reference to this manual will help to ensure that defect identification is conducted in an accurate and consistent manner. 

Disappearing traffic? The story so far

Publisher: 
Municipal Engineer
Publication date: 
March 2002
Abstract: 

Reallocating roadspace from general traffic, to improve conditions for pedestrians or cyclists or buses or on-street light rail or other high-occupancy vehicles, is often pre- dicted to cause major traffic problems on neighbouring streets. This paper reports on two phases of research, resulting in the examination of over 70 case studies of roadspace reallocation from eleven countries, and the collation of opinions from over 200 transport professionals worldwide.

Evaluating active travel and health economic impacts of small streetscape schemes: An exploratory study in London

Publisher: 
Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: 
November 2018
Abstract: 

Introduction: This article proposes a low-cost approach that transport authorities can use to evaluate small-scale active travel interventions, including estimating health economic benefits from uptake of walking and/or cycling.

Creating Enjoyable Cities - Low Traffic Neighbourhoods

Publisher: 
Christopher Martin
Publication date: 
February 2019
Abstract: 

The following guide offers my thoughts on how we can better shape cities around communities and people, both in emerging cities where this issue is of critical importance, and in developed cities. All cities need to offer the advantages of urban living to more and more people, but have to do so in a way that is best for people, best for the city, and best for society as a whole. Shaping cities around low-traffic neighbourhoods is key to creating inclusive, sustainable, and enjoyable places.

UK housing: Fit for the future?

Publisher: 
Committee on Climate Change
Publication date: 
February 2019
Abstract: 

Key messages

Car parking - What Works Where

Publisher: 
English Partnerships - The National Regeneration Agency
Publication date: 
March 2006
Abstract: 

This manual takes stock of common car parking treatments and reviews how successful they are in providing adequate levels of safe parking within a high quality environment. Here the introduction briefly reviews recent studies into demand, allocation and parking efficiency as a starting point for designers. It also touches on innovation, including mechanical systems, homezones and the use of travel plans such as car clubs.

Understanding attitudes to priorities at side road junctions

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
January 2019
Abstract: 

Junctions are places of interaction and hence conflict for all road users. Two thirds of all collisions in built up areas occur at junctions, with pedestrians and cyclists being most at risk. The aim of the research is to investigate the attitudes to change, and likely behaviour at junctions, of all types of road users, were a general and unambiguous duty to ‘give way on turning’ to be introduced in the UK context. Q-methodology was used because it is good at capturing and describing divergent views and also consensus.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - UK