UK

Walking and Cycling: the Economic Benefits

Publisher: 
Transport for London
Publication date: 
July 2019
Abstract: 

This pack outlines the economic benefits of encouraging more walking and cycling in cities. It sets out the strongest evidence from London and elsewhere, grouped into six major topic areas.

It is aimed at policy makers, local communities, officers in local and national government, business networks and everyone else who is interested in how investment in walking and cycling can create more prosperous cities.

Better planning, better transport, better places

Publisher: 
CIHT
Publication date: 
August 2019
Abstract: 

For the last 20 years, governments have attempted to encourage a more sustainable approach to transport within spatial planning but have made limited progress.

Car parking and traffic still dominate housingdevelopments. Sustainable access to local services is poor. Sustainable approaches to transport are largely non-existent. The way we currently travel and thecontinued growth in road traffic are damaging our health,harming our towns, and contributing to climate change.

A Guide to Inclusive Cycling (2nd Edition)

Publisher: 
Wheels for Wellbeing
Publication date: 
June 2019
Abstract: 

This guide does not claim to be the answer to everything about inclusive cycling. Nor is it a highly technical set of design guidelines. Rather, it is somewhere in between: an accessible but thorough guide on the basic principles of inclusive cycling. We hope that it will be a useful tool for local authorities, transport bodies, civil engineers, academics, cycling organisations, disability charities, campaign groups and, of course, Disabled cyclists themselves.

Street Design in the UK - Pilot Survey

Publisher: 
Urban Design Group
Publication date: 
September 2018
Abstract: 

This survey has obtained a picture of street design and adoption practice in Great Britain. While there are some councils that have been reported to have lead, required or encouraged outstanding examples of street design, there is an underlying concern at a system level including:

  • Failures to adopt industry best practice in street design and the persistent use of outdated and questionable highway design standards dating from the 1960s or earlier.

Sharing Road Space: Drivers and Cyclists as Equal Road Users

Publisher: 
Scottish Executive Central Research Unit
Publication date: 
January 2001
Abstract: 

The Government has made a commitment to sustainable transport as part of an integrated transport strategy, encouraging a decrease in the use of cars and increasing the use of cycling as a viable mode of transport. As one element of their transportation policies, local authorities are expected to produce local cycling strategies which include the implementation of improvements to infrastructure and the initiation of traffic management measures.

The Little Book of Highway Defects

Publisher: 
Oxfordshire County Council
Publication date: 
November 2013
Abstract: 

The primary purpose of this manual is to provide a pictorial reference guide to describing common highway defects - some of which my prove to be a safety hazard to the road network user. Reference to this manual will help to ensure that defect identification is conducted in an accurate and consistent manner. 

The Little Book of Highway Defects

Publisher: 
Oxfordshire County Council
Publication date: 
November 2013
Abstract: 

The primary purpose of this manual is to provide a pictorial reference guide to describing common highway defects - some of which my prove to be a safety hazard to the road network user. Reference to this manual will help to ensure that defect identification is conducted in an accurate and consistent manner. 

Disappearing traffic? The story so far

Publisher: 
Municipal Engineer
Publication date: 
March 2002
Abstract: 

Reallocating roadspace from general traffic, to improve conditions for pedestrians or cyclists or buses or on-street light rail or other high-occupancy vehicles, is often pre- dicted to cause major traffic problems on neighbouring streets. This paper reports on two phases of research, resulting in the examination of over 70 case studies of roadspace reallocation from eleven countries, and the collation of opinions from over 200 transport professionals worldwide.

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