UK

Justifying investments in cycling infrastructure: 10 lessons learnt

Publisher: 
CT Think
Publication date: 
January 2016
Abstract: 

Public bodies in England who wish to fund cycling infrastructure need to present a business case that justifies the investment. The idea of spending money to encourage people to cycle wasn’t central to public policy in the UK until quite recently. We therefore make the case for investment in cycling using an approach that evolved from the appraisal of more traditional transport projects, like highway improvements or new railway stations.

Stakeholders, politics, and the media

Publisher: 
Rachel Aldred
Publication date: 
October 2015
Abstract: 

This chapter explores relationships between stakeholders, politics, and the media in relation to transport and urban planning, within the context of the need to move towards more sustainable mobility systems. It addresses these themes by discussing a case study of cycling in London, where the recent policy context has been shaped both by media and by cycling advocates. The chosen case study allows some broader conclusions to be drawn about social change and the prospects of moving to more sustainable transport systems. These relate to:

TRL610 Cycling in Bus Lanes

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL)
Publication date: 
November 2004
Abstract: 

Cyclists in the UK are normally permitted to use with-flow bus lanes and other bus priority facilities because sustainable modes of transport are being encouraged and because cycling in bus lanes is usually safer than riding outside them between moving buses and general traffic.

Predictors of the frequency and subjective experience of cycling near misses: findings from the first two years of the UK Near Miss Project

Publisher: 
Accident Analysis & Prevention
Publication date: 
January 2018
Abstract: 

Using 2014 and 2015 data from the UK Near Miss Project, this paper examines the stability of self-report incident rates for cycling near misses across these two years. It further examines the stability of the individual-level predictors of experiencing a near miss, including what influences the scariness of an incident. The paper uses three questions asked for only in 2015, which allow further exploration of factors shaping near miss rates and impacts of incidents.

Developing satisfaction measure Research with cyclists, pedestrians and equestrians

Publisher: 
Future Thinking
Publication date: 
January 2018
Abstract: 

Transport Focus represents the interests of users of England’s motorways and major ‘A’ roads (the Strategic Road Network or SRN) and therefore wanted to understand the experiences and needs of cyclists, pedestrians, equestrians and carriage drivers who travel along SRN ‘A’ roads or need to cross any part of the SRN.

Future Thinking was commissioned to study these audiences, exploring not only their attitudes towards and interactions with the SRN but to also gauge views of the best means by which to achieve a robust future measurement of SRN satisfaction for these groups.

‘Resistance was futile!’ Cycling’s discourses of resistance to UK automobile modernism 1950–1970

Publisher: 
Planning Perspectives
Publication date: 
July 2017
Abstract: 

This paper investigates the place of utility cycling (cycling as a means of transport rather than as a sport or leisure activity) under urban modernism in the UK. In many western contexts the dominant feature of urban modernism was its emphasis on accommodating private vehicles to the neglect of other forms of mobility. The result was the production of a ‘car-system’ with significant change to urban and rural environments.

Barriers to investing in cycling: Stakeholder views from England

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
November 2017
Abstract: 

Background

Planners and politicians in many countries seek to increase the proportion of trips made by cycling. However, this is often challenging. In England, a national target to double cycling by 2025 is likely to be missed: between 2001 and 2011 the proportion of commutes made by cycling barely grew. One important contributory factor is continued low investment in cycling infrastructure, by comparison to European leaders.

Guide to the Healthy Streets Indicators

Publisher: 
Transport for London
Publication date: 
November 2017
Abstract: 

The Healthy Streets Approach puts people and their health at the centre of decisions about how we design, manage and use public spaces. It aims to make our streets healthy, safe and welcoming for everyone.

The Approach is based on 10 Indicators of a Healthy Street which focus on the experience of people using streets.

There are two main indicators:

  • Pedestrians from all walks of life

  • People choose to walk, cycle and use public

    transport

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - UK