UK

Are head injuries to cyclists an important cause of death in road travel fatalities?

Publisher: 
Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: 
July 2018
Abstract: 

Background: Despite the well-recognised benefit for individuals and communities of increased active travel, cycling remains a minority travel mode in many high income countries. Fear of injury is often cited as a reason. Campaigns to promote cycle helmet wear are alleged to contribute to this. However, there is little information on whether head injuries to cyclists are an important cause of death in road travel fatalities, compared with other road users.

Running out of road - investing in cycling in Cambridge, MIlton Keynes and Oxford

Publisher: 
National Infrastructure Commission
Publication date: 
July 2018
Abstract: 

The Cambridge – Milton Keynes – Oxford corridor is one of the fastest-growing, most productive, most innovative places in the UK. It could become Britain’s Silicon Valley. But it could also stagnate, strangled by unaffordable housing and inadequate transport.

Impacts of an active travel intervention with a cycling focus in a suburban context: One-year fi ndings from an evaluation of London’s in-progress mini-Hollands programme

Publisher: 
Science Direct
Publication date: 
June 2018
Abstract: 

Report shows that 'strong' Mini Holland' interventions generate more walking and more cycling, and don't identifiably increase traffic in surrounding areas, suggesting that providing good infra drives genuine growth in active travel.

 

A Guide to Low Traffic Neighbourhoods

Publisher: 
London Cycling Campaign, Living Streets
Publication date: 
May 2018
Abstract: 

This guide is from London Cycling Campaign and Living Streets and draws on expertise from those who’ve designed, implemented and campaigned for award-winning low traffic neighbourhoods. It is
a companion document to “Low traffic neighbourhoods: What, why, how?”, designed to help officers, designers and others begin to understand some of the complexities, nuances and capabilities of these schemes in more detail.

Inequalities in utility and leisure cycling in England, and variation by local cycling prevalence

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
July 2018
Abstract: 

This paper analyses Active People Survey data (collected 2011/12 to 2015/16) on 789,196 English adults, providing new information on how a range of socio-demographic factors are associated with utility and leisure cycling. Substantial inequalities are found in relation to gender, age, disability, and ethnicity for both types of cycling. For gender and age, and perhaps for disability in relation to recreational cycling, inequalities are moderated by local cycling prevalence such that English authorities with more cycling see less inequality.

Planning for cycling in the dispersed city: establishing a hierarchy of effectiveness of municipal cycling policies

Publisher: 
Transportation
Publication date: 
April 2018
Abstract: 

Urban utility cycling is being promoted widely due to various health, social, economic and environmental benefits. This study seeks to identify and rank which munic- ipal-level policies and other factors are most influential in increasing cycling as a means of everyday transport and improving the real and perceived cycling safety in car-oriented urban centres. This is achieved by identifying the key factors thought to influence cycle use and by establishing a hierarchy of effectiveness of municipal cycling policies.

Cycling in Pedestrian Areas

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL)
Publication date: 
January 1993
Abstract: 

The main aim of this study was to determine whether any real factors contribute to the exclusion of cyclists from some pedestrian areas. In these areas where cycling is permitted, it has been achieved by: (a) shared use of the whole, or certain sections of the pedestrian area; (b) combined use with selected motor vehicles (eg buses and service vehicles); (c) time-restricted access; (d) special paths for cyclists. This study was in two stages, in stage one, 1 hour video recordings of pedestrian areas at 12 sites in England and at 9 sites in mainland Europe were taken.

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