UK

Healthy Streets for London

Publisher: 
Transport for London
Publication date: 
February 2017
Abstract: 

London is facing an inactivity crisis. Over decades, machines, cars and technology have gradually taken over many of the tasks that used to require physical effort. More than 40 per cent of Londoners

do not achieve the recommended 150 minutes of activity a week; and 28 per cent do less than 30 minutes a week. Almost without realising it, we have engineered physical activity out of our daily lives.

Analysis of police collision files for pedal cyclist fatalities in London, 2001 - 2006

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory
Publication date: 
October 2009
Abstract: 

The numbers of pedal cyclist fatalities in London have varied over the years from 1986 to 2006; averaging 18 per year, the maximum was 33 in 1989 and the minimum was 8 in 2004. There has been a substantial increase in cycling, particularly in central and inner London. The London Travel Report 2007 (Transport for London, 2007a) reported that in 2006 the cycle flows on London’s major roads were almost twice as many as in 2000. During the period January 2001 to December 2006 a total of 108 pedal cyclists were killed in London.

Understanding the Strengths and Weaknesses of Britain's Road Safety Performance PPR796

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL)
Publication date: 
September 2016
Abstract: 

There are fewer road deaths per head of the population in Britain than in almost any other country in the world. With minor variations in international rankings, this has been the case consistently for many years. The most recent data (2015) show that Norway and Sweden both have fewer road deaths per head than Britain while Switzerland, Denmark and the Netherlands have more.

Cycling infrastructure in London

Publisher: 
Institute of Civil Engineers Proceedings
Publication date: 
November 2015
Abstract: 

The aims of this article are to demonstrate the successes and failures of the £100million London Cycle Network plus project and to discuss the standard of the highway engineering schemes delivered, particularly in relation to their overall effect on ride quality as defined by the cycling level of service assessment set out in the 2014 London cycling design standards. By highlighting areas where changes could have been made to improve the delivery of the project, it is hoped that lessons can be learnt for future projects of this type.

The Effect of Road Narrowings on Cyclists

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory
Publication date: 
December 2004
Abstract: 

The objectives of this study were to examine the issues regarding road narrowings and to monitor the benefits of measures designed to assist cyclists. The general approach to the study programme was to divide the research into four main elements: 

Bicycle infrastructure: can good design encourage cycling?

Publisher: 
Urban, Planning and Transport Research
Publication date: 
October 2014
Abstract: 

This research posits the question that good design of the bicycle infrastructure in a city will encourage more people to cycle. Research is carried out to compare the cycle infrastructure in selected European cities against an adapted Level of Service concept using accompanied ride-alongs. The literature review on the factors that encourage/dissuade cycle use suggests that it is the potential rider’s perceptions on the safety of cycling in their neighbourhood that is the deciding feature.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - UK