National

Evaluation of the Cycling City and Towns Programme: Qualitative Research with Residents

Publisher: 
DfT
Publication date: 
August 2012
Abstract: 

This report presents findings from qualitative research undertaken with residents of the Cycling City and Towns, during the programme period. It explores their cycling behaviour and how they responded to the investment in cycling in their local areas. By setting cycling decisions in the context of individual and family lives, and also the wider environment, the research identifies:

  • the key triggers for changes in how people choose to travel, and
  • the contextual factors which support or constrain cycling at those points – including the role of cycling schemes and interventions.

This provides new insights on cycling behavioural change for decision makers and researchers in transport and other sectors.

Of particular interest is this observation:

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Understanding Walking and Cycling: Summary of Key Findings and Recommendations

Publisher: 
Lancaster University
Publication date: 
September 2011
Abstract: 

It is widely recognized that there is a need to increase levels of active and sustainable travel in British urban areas. The Understanding Walking and Cycling (UWAC) project, funded by the EPSRC, has examined the factors influencing everyday travel decisions and proposes a series of policy measures to increase levels of walking and cycling for short trips in urban areas. A wide range of both quantitative and qualitative data were collected in four English towns (Leeds, Leicester, Worcester, Lancaster), including a questionnaire survey, analysis of the built environment, interviews and ethnographies. Key findings of the research are that whilst attitudes to walking and cycling are mostly positive or neutral, many people who would like to engage in more active travel fail to do so due to a combination of factors. These can be summarised as:

  • Concerns about the physical environment, especially with regard to safety when walking or cycling;
  • The difficulty of fitting walking and cycling into complex household routines (especially with young children);
  • The perception that walking and cycling are in some ways abnormal things to do so.

It is suggested that policies to increase levels of walking and cycling should focus not only on improving infrastructure (for instance through fully segregated cycle routes), but also must tackle broader social, economic, cultural and legal factors that currently inhibit walking and cycling. Together, such changes can create an environment in which driving for short trips in urban areas is seen as abnormal and walking or cycling seem the obvious choices.


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Re-imagining urban spaces to help revitalise our high streets

Publisher: 
Department for Communities and Local Government
Publication date: 
July 2012
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Abstract: 

The Portas Review highlighted the challenges that face our high streets and town centres. With shopping habits changing, high streets need to evolve – to build on their strengths and offer a viable and exciting alternative to out-of-town and internet shopping. High streets and town centres that are fit for the 21st century need to offer a different mix of retail, services and facilities, a different style of interaction, and a variety of experiences that are about more than shopping.

Town centres and high streets have buildings and roads, but the spaces in-between are what hold them together as a place – the open spaces, streets, squares, green spaces and the network of pavements and pedestrian thoroughfares that knit them together. All too often, these spaces are used as no more than that – thoroughfares – and we start to forget that they can be so much more.

This document is aimed at anyone working to improve their high street, town centre or retail area, whether you are a neighbourhood partnership, a group of businesses, a private landowner or a local authority. Its goal is to remind us of the potential of these urban spaces, and how, with some imagination and creative thought, they can add identity to a place to help combat clone town syndrome, and help make the local high street a destination of choice.

The section at the back of this document aims to signpost some of the key documents, guidance, tools and sources of support that you may find helpful in thinking about how best to design or use the urban spaces in your area.

All sorts of good stuff about reversing the trend for our urban spaces to be terrorised by motor traffic.

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Healthy transport = Healthy lives

Publisher: 
BMA
Publication date: 
July 2012
Abstract: 

People have always wanted to reach destinations quickly, safely and efficiently. But as the UK transport environment has become increasingly complex, transport’s impact on health has become unnecessarily harmful - to the point where it is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality.

Our aim is to show the positive effect that integrating health into transport policy will have and we propose areas for action that prioritise health for all relevant transport sectors.

Our new report is intended for transport, energy, sustainability and climate change policy makers with strategic or operational responsibility for public health and health promotion in the UK, and will be of interest to health professionals and the public.

The BMA sings the praises of cycling and walking, and less car use, to improve the health of the nation.

They seem to have done a fair amount of work, if only reviewing literature, and the document has much to be agreed with. In particular they appear to agree with the CEoGB's view that mass cycling will not return unless motor vehicles are segregated away from people on bicycles.

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CYCLING CULTURES, Summary of key findings and recommendations

Publisher: 
University of East London
Publication date: 
June 2012

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Cycle to Work Alliance Behavioural Impact Analysis

Publisher: 
Cycle to Work Alliance
Publication date: 
February 2011
Abstract: 

The Cycle to Work Alliance has conducted this research project to gain a better understanding of the health and environmental benefits of the cycle to work scheme and the motivations that have driven demand from the users of the scheme, and the employers who offer it.

The questions focused on issues regarding CO2 emissions and health; the analysis of the data looks at the role the scheme plays in improving employee engagement, encouraging healthier lives and in helping the UK meeting its CO2 emissions reduction targets.

The commentary and views expressed in this Behavioural Impact Analysis (except where specific quotations are given) are the Cycle to Work Alliance‟s own.

Norman Baker opens this document by saying:

There are so many positives to cycling that I hardly know where to begin this foreword. 

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Making walking and cycling normal: key findings from the understanding walking and cycling research project

Publisher: 
NICE / Lancaster University
Publication date: 
February 2012
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Expert testimony from Colin Poole submitted and published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellents (NICE) in Spring 2012.


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Open Letter to Nick Clegg

Publisher: 
Cycling Embassy of Great Britain
Publication date: 
June 2012
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CEoGB Board Structure AGM 2012

Publisher: 
Cycling Embassy of Great Britain
Publication date: 
May 2012
Abstract: 

Current Board structure of Cycling Embassy of Great Britain for review at AGM 2012

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CEoGB Accounts & Treasurers Report AGM 2012

Publisher: 
Cycling Embassy of Great Britain
Publication date: 
May 2012
Abstract: 

Amended accounts from the 2012 AGM

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