UK examples of best practice

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dave42w
UK examples of best practice

In Leicester we have a chunk of money now allocated from government to fund the conversion of one lane of part of the central ring road to a 2 way cycle track (Newarke St).

The Leicester Cycling Campaign Group are hoping to meet the engineer soon and we are concerned that the design and implementation (which is being rushed through at present) will not meet our needs.

What we need is UK design examples for them to copy. We believe that a segregated route with protection from cars driving onto it is needed. Without something to stop cars/vans driving onto the cycle track we believe the track is going to be blocked much of the time by parked vehicles.

The engineers are not interested in designs from other countries, only from the UK.

They are underpressure to make this better for pedestrians as well as allowing 2 way cycling which also means we are worried that the cycle track might get squeezed.

Thanks

Dave

andy_gla

Some examples from the Glasgow area:

A two-way cycle track with bollarded gaps for access across to side roads opposite: http://cycle.st/p33529

A cycle track (one-way in these cases) next to footway, barriered off from main dual carriageway: http://cycle.st/p26200 & http://cycle.st/p29828

Best avoid doing this: http://cycle.st/p47398

On-road cycle lanes with hatching separation and occasional traffic islands, which suffer from car parking: http://cycle.st/p29829

Remember to find out how the cycle track will end: http://cycle.st/p32200

And if there are any bus stops, try to avoid this: http://cycle.st/p31515

HTH,

Andy

dave42w

Andy, 

Very helpful. Thanks. 

More examples are welcome. 

Dave 

sallyhinch

Some info here

http://www.sustrans.org.uk/article/inspiring-infrastructure-old-shoreham-road-brighton

There's also the London plans for better segregated infrastructure such as at Royal College Street where they're planning lightweight segregation 

http://www.camdencyclists.org.uk/newsitems/ccc/proposed-changes-in-royal-college-street-2

Interestingly the latter started out rather narrow and is now planned to be widened due to heavy use so it may be that if you end up with something that's a bit of a squeeze, it can still be a stepping stone to other things

Sadly, Belfast's kerb segregated track on Upper Arthur Street still gets parked on (looks nice and wide though) 

http://nigreenways.wordpress.com/2013/03/29/bin-lane-becomes-ulster-bank-delivery-lane/

Hope this helps and good luck

AKA TownMouse

sallyhinch

AKA TownMouse

pete owens

HUNINGDON ROAD: 1.4m gutter cycle lane is not "good-practice" but fails to meet even rubish UK standards.

TRUMPINDON LANE: 1.5m on carriagway cycle lanes in the door zone are not "good-practice" but "lethal" - even by UK standards: http://www.warringtoncyclecampaign.co.uk/facility-of-the-month/October2001.htm 

2.5 m is not wide enough for a kerb  bounded 2-way cycle track and 0.6m is only half the width of an open car door.

HILLS ROAD: 2.1m cycle tracks do just meet the minimum requirement for one-way use but are not wide enough to overtake.

All three cases show marginal improvements to what were totally inadequate to positively dangerous arrangements in the first place so we shouldn't complain too loudly, but they certainly shouldn't be highlighted as examples of best practice.

PaulM

Royal College St in Camden, London, which recently finished a consultation and started shovel work, uses a mix of planters and "armadillos" https://consultations.wearecamden.org/culture-environment/royal-college-street-cycle-facility-improvements  I think the armidillos may be new to UK, but are extensively used in Barcelona.

PaulM

pete owens

Royal College Street should act a a warning against two-way cycle tracks such as Leicester seem to be thinking of. The works on Royal College Street were justified by the poor safety record - particularly for cyclists - of the existing layout, which is ... a two-way cycle track that was constructed by reallocating one lane of a one-way street:

http://goo.gl/maps/fP5oF

The best way of treating giratories is to tackle the problem at source rather than attempt to tag facilities onto an inherently hostile road layouts - ie return the roads to conventional two-way streets as can be found all over the country and probably even in Leicester. The main traffic would follow Oxford St & Infirmary Rd leaving Newarke Street as a quiet access street.

However, they are probably committed to spending the cash on a cycle path so your focus needs to be on how that can be implemented safely - and as others have pointed out the biggest issues will be arrangements to get across the junctions. It is essential that these fully signalised with a dedicated phase for the cycle track, ideally with loop detectors to detect approaching cyclists.

 

As Easy As Ridi...

The best way of treating giratories is to tackle the problem at source rather than attempt to tag facilities onto an inherently hostile road layouts - ie return the roads to conventional two-way streets as can be found all over the country and probably even in Leicester.

I don't think that's necessarily true. Dutch cities are full of one-way roads for motor vehicles (just like Royal College Street) where the space gained is used for two-way cycling. Designing roads like this has the added benefit of making journeys by motor vehicles more indirect than by by bike.

Royal College Street will be far more attractive for the general public to cycle on in its new guise - with two wide cycle tracks - than a conventional two-way road, where people are expected to cycle with general traffic, including buses and lorries. Even I - an experienced and confident cyclist - do not find this enjoyable, or pleasant. Think about how to make cycling a pleasant experience.

mat-s

Thanks for all the contributions. I've started putting some examples together - the Royal College St plans look particularly good.

Re unwinding the gyratory - we'd love to undo the Newarke St one and the one down the road around the Rugby Ground and the one around Freemens Common but that's not on the cards yet. A decent facility on Newarke St will be a highly visible part of a (almost completely) traffic free route from NCN route 6 on Great Central Way (also traffic free and accessible to large numbers of people) to the city centre.

Cheers,

Mat

lccg.org.uk
@leicsterccg

sallyhinch

I hope someone from Leicester will be able to come to the AGM http://www.cycling-embassy.org.uk/news/2013/03/27/cycling-embassy-members-to-gather-at-newcastle - be a good chance to talk about how the Embassy can act as a resource for campaigns such as these (if at all)

AKA TownMouse

mat-s

We wanted to come but were busy drumming up memberships at the Riverside Festival. As mentioned elsewhere, the East Midlands Cycle Forum is likely to be in Leics in Sept and I'm sure the CEOGB would be welcome.

You might be interested in the latest from Leicester.


Mat

lccg.org.uk
@leicsterccg

sallyhinch

As I mentioned on twitter elsewhere, I wonder if an infrastructure safari around Leicester would be in order? We could maybe combine the two...

AKA TownMouse

dave42w

Thanks for all the help. You can see what we came up with at http://leicesterccg.wordpress.com/2013/05/14/newarke-st/

sallyhinch

I hope you get some results

AKA TownMouse

peoplesfrontofr...

Great, simple presentation that made the case, without instantly rolling over with the usual "Oh, but we  know it'll be hard" crap. Top work from Leics.!

sallyhinch

This resource from John Dales may be useful http://www.urbanmovement.co.uk/2/post/2013/05/cycling-in-the-citya-compendium-of-international-practice.html

It just gathers together in one place information about a range of cycling solutions, with pictures - some UK and some from abroad. 

AKA TownMouse

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