Some more quality infrastructure

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grimnorth
Some more quality infrastructure

http://www.bedfordshire-news.co.uk/News/New-road-layout-puts-drivers-in-...

This time in Bedford.

FYI, this site http://www.transportinfo.org.uk/ is worth a look for Transport related news…

sallyhinch

It almost looks like an attempt at a dutch style rural road, where there’s one single lane for cars in both directions, and dotted line shoulders/bike lanes taking up the rest of the space (http://www.swov.nl/rapport/Factsheets/UK/FS_Driving_strips.pdf). Ideally, the cars negotiate passage as they would on a single track rural road, and use the dotted line space to pass each other if there’s no cyclists in the way but clearly, without that being a common sight, it’s causing confusion among drivers (note that in the Netherlands this would be a road with a 60km/h speed limit and low volumes of traffic – any faster or busier and they’d put separate tracks in). Obviously some sort of signing to encourage cars to give way to each other is needed – as you might with a narrow bridge or other pinch point. Or perhaps some ‘passing places’?

AKA TownMouse

pete owens

Causing confusuion among drivers is a good thing. The more certainty you give them the faster they drive. Though motorists don't tend to be so stupid that they need signs to tell them that it is a good idea to try to avoid crashing in to each other.

This is rare case of a cycle lane that reallocates space from motorists to cyclists (rather than vice versa) - and being unusual it will tend to attract controversy. Indeed, one test of ANY infrastructure that actually benefits cyclists is that it will  attract a hostile press. The more common arrangement - where the centre line is retained and a narrow cycle lane is painted in the gutter to try to prevent us obstructing motorists for as much as a second will be seen a normal thus attract no controversy at all.

With this arrangement motorists have a lane that gives them sufficient space to overtake a cyclist without squeezing past - but they can only do this if there is no oncoming traffic. If there is oncoming traffic then they need to move into the cycle lane to get past which is fine during the 99% of time it is unoccupied (ie the cycle lanes ARE the passing places). This is a good thing as the passage of motor vehicles helps sweep the cycle lane of debris. The key to thescheme haowever, is the fact they have to move into the cycle lane to pass oncoming ttraffic gives them the clear message that they are in the cyclists space so cannot overtake untill the main lane is free.

The very fact that a driver is in a lane where he can expect oncoming traffic acts to reduce speed far more effectively than a posted speed limit.

pete owens

Causing confusuion among drivers is a good thing. The more certainty you give them the faster they drive. Though motorists don't tend to be so stupid that they need signs to tell them that it is a good idea to try to avoid crashing in to each other.

This is rare case of a cycle lane that reallocates space from motorists to cyclists (rather than vice versa) - and being unusual it will tend to attract controversy. Indeed, one test of ANY infrastructure that actually benefits cyclists is that it will  attract a hostile press. The more common arrangement - where the centre line is retained and a narrow cycle lane is painted in the gutter to try to prevent us obstructing motorists for as much as a second will be seen a normal thus attract no controversy at all.

With this arrangement motorists have a lane that gives them sufficient space to overtake a cyclist without squeezing past - but they can only do this if there is no oncoming traffic. If there is oncoming traffic then they need to move into the cycle lane to get past which is fine during the 99% of time it is unoccupied (ie the cycle lanes ARE the passing places). This is a good thing as the passage of motor vehicles helps sweep the cycle lane of debris. The key to the scheme however, is the fact they have to move into the cycle lane to pass oncoming ttraffic gives them the clear message that they are in the cyclists space so cannot overtake untill the main lane is free.

The very fact that a driver is in a lane where he can expect oncoming traffic acts to reduce speed far more effectively than a posted speed limit.

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