safety

Understanding attitudes to priorities at side road junctions

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
January 2019
Abstract: 

Junctions are places of interaction and hence conflict for all road users. Two thirds of all collisions in built up areas occur at junctions, with pedestrians and cyclists being most at risk. The aim of the research is to investigate the attitudes to change, and likely behaviour at junctions, of all types of road users, were a general and unambiguous duty to ‘give way on turning’ to be introduced in the UK context. Q-methodology was used because it is good at capturing and describing divergent views and also consensus.

Sustainable Safety in the Netherlands: the vision, the implementation and the safety effects

Publisher: 
SWOV
Publication date: 
June 2005
Abstract: 

Human errors play a vital role in road crashes. This paper deals with the prevention of human errors by proper road planning, road design and improving existing roads within the framework of the Dutch 'Sustainable Safety' vision. This vision focuses on three design principles for road networks and for roads and streets: functionality, homogeneity, and predictability. A minimum safety level should be defined and agreed upon by all road authorities, national, regional, and local.

A safer road environment for cyclists

Publisher: 
SWOV
Publication date: 
August 2013
Abstract: 

This thesis focuses on the question of how the road environment (road design and network characteristics) affects road safety for cyclists through effects on risk and exposure to risk. In this thesis, the term ‘road design’ is used to denote the location level (e.g. intersection design) while the term ‘network characteristics’ is used in relation to the network level (e.g. the presence of a road hierarchy and road classification). Road design plays a role in cyclists’ crash and injury risk. Network characteristics affect mode and route choice (Heinen et al.

Pedal Cyclist Fatalities in London: Analysis of Police Collision Files (2007-2011)

Publisher: 
UCL & Loughborough University
Publication date: 
September 2014
Abstract: 

The objective of this research report is to support the development of the forthcoming Cycle Safety Action Plan being prepared by Transport for London to be published in 2014. TfL wished to improve the understanding of the factors which lead to collisions involving fatally injured cyclists and those with life-changing injuries. The research focussed on an in-depth analysis of collisions that occurred between 2007 – 2011 when there were 79 fatal and life threatening collisions involving cyclists of which 53 were available for analysis.

Analysis of police collision files for pedal cyclist fatalities in London, 2001 - 2006

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory
Publication date: 
October 2009
Abstract: 

The numbers of pedal cyclist fatalities in London have varied over the years from 1986 to 2006; averaging 18 per year, the maximum was 33 in 1989 and the minimum was 8 in 2004. There has been a substantial increase in cycling, particularly in central and inner London. The London Travel Report 2007 (Transport for London, 2007a) reported that in 2006 the cycle flows on London’s major roads were almost twice as many as in 2000. During the period January 2001 to December 2006 a total of 108 pedal cyclists were killed in London.

Keuzeschema sanering palen op fietspaden (selection plan for bollards on cycle paths)

Publisher: 
CROW
Publication date: 
December 2014
Abstract: 

This selection planning document helps road managers to decide on the placement of bollards in cycle paths. In addition, it gives recommendations on the safe design of locations where bollards are deemed necessary. The selection schedule was completely renewed in December 2014 based on extensive practical evaluations.

 

Diversifying and normalising cycling in London, UK: an exploratory study on the influence of infrastructure

Publisher: 
Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: 
November 2016
Abstract: 

This article examines the extent to which protected infrastructure is associated with greater diversity and normalisation of cycling. In the UK, cyclists are predominantly male and often wear distinctive cycle clothing rather than everyday clothes. This is not the case in higher-cycling countries such as the Netherlands and Germany. It has been argued that the UK's demographic skewing may be partly due to poor quality infrastructure which can be off-putting for many, but particularly for women, children and older people.

The health risks and benefits of cycling in urban environments compared with car use: health impact assessment study

Publisher: 
BMJ
Publication date: 
July 2011
Abstract: 

Objective

To estimate the risks and benefits to health of travel by bicycle, using a bicycle sharing scheme, compared with travel by car in an urban environment.

Design

Health impact assessment study.

Setting

Public bicycle sharing initiative, Bicing, in Barcelona, Spain.

Participants

181 982 Bicing subscribers.

Sidewalk Bicycling Safety Issues

Publisher: 
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Publication date: 
December 1998

Road safety and percieved risk of cycle tracks and lanes in Copenhagen

Publisher: 
Trafitec / City of Copenhagen
Publication date: 
May 2007
Abstract: 

A study of accidents in Copenhagen before and after an extensive network of cycle lanes and tracks was installed.

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