Cycling

Inequalities in utility and leisure cycling in England, and variation by local cycling prevalence

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
July 2018
Abstract: 

This paper analyses Active People Survey data (collected 2011/12 to 2015/16) on 789,196 English adults, providing new information on how a range of socio-demographic factors are associated with utility and leisure cycling. Substantial inequalities are found in relation to gender, age, disability, and ethnicity for both types of cycling. For gender and age, and perhaps for disability in relation to recreational cycling, inequalities are moderated by local cycling prevalence such that English authorities with more cycling see less inequality.

Planning for cycling in the dispersed city: establishing a hierarchy of effectiveness of municipal cycling policies

Publisher: 
Transportation
Publication date: 
April 2018
Abstract: 

Urban utility cycling is being promoted widely due to various health, social, economic and environmental benefits. This study seeks to identify and rank which munic- ipal-level policies and other factors are most influential in increasing cycling as a means of everyday transport and improving the real and perceived cycling safety in car-oriented urban centres. This is achieved by identifying the key factors thought to influence cycle use and by establishing a hierarchy of effectiveness of municipal cycling policies.

Cycling in Pedestrian Areas

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL)
Publication date: 
January 1993
Abstract: 

The main aim of this study was to determine whether any real factors contribute to the exclusion of cyclists from some pedestrian areas. In these areas where cycling is permitted, it has been achieved by: (a) shared use of the whole, or certain sections of the pedestrian area; (b) combined use with selected motor vehicles (eg buses and service vehicles); (c) time-restricted access; (d) special paths for cyclists. This study was in two stages, in stage one, 1 hour video recordings of pedestrian areas at 12 sites in England and at 9 sites in mainland Europe were taken.

TRL610 Cycling in Bus Lanes

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL)
Publication date: 
November 2004
Abstract: 

Cyclists in the UK are normally permitted to use with-flow bus lanes and other bus priority facilities because sustainable modes of transport are being encouraged and because cycling in bus lanes is usually safer than riding outside them between moving buses and general traffic.

Predictors of the frequency and subjective experience of cycling near misses: findings from the first two years of the UK Near Miss Project

Publisher: 
Accident Analysis & Prevention
Publication date: 
January 2018
Abstract: 

Using 2014 and 2015 data from the UK Near Miss Project, this paper examines the stability of self-report incident rates for cycling near misses across these two years. It further examines the stability of the individual-level predictors of experiencing a near miss, including what influences the scariness of an incident. The paper uses three questions asked for only in 2015, which allow further exploration of factors shaping near miss rates and impacts of incidents.

Developing satisfaction measure Research with cyclists, pedestrians and equestrians

Publisher: 
Future Thinking
Publication date: 
January 2018
Abstract: 

Transport Focus represents the interests of users of England’s motorways and major ‘A’ roads (the Strategic Road Network or SRN) and therefore wanted to understand the experiences and needs of cyclists, pedestrians, equestrians and carriage drivers who travel along SRN ‘A’ roads or need to cross any part of the SRN.

Future Thinking was commissioned to study these audiences, exploring not only their attitudes towards and interactions with the SRN but to also gauge views of the best means by which to achieve a robust future measurement of SRN satisfaction for these groups.

Performance of Municipal Cycling Policies in Medium-Sized Cities in the Netherlands since 2000

Publisher: 
Transport Reviews
Publication date: 
July 2015
Abstract: 

With its high cycling mode share, the Netherlands is often seen as a best practice for cycling policies. However, there is little insight into the drivers behind this phenomenon, specifically which policy interventions increased cycling rates and which did not. The knowledge gap on the effec- tiveness of cycling policies seriously limits the potential for learning from the Dutch experience. This paper will address this gap, by exploring the performance of Dutch cycling policies in 22 medium- sized cities since 2000.

Health, physical inactivity, obesity and cycling

The New Year is traditionally the time when we renounce the excess of the festive season and make resolutions - formal or otherwise - to change our diet and to fit exercise into our busy daily lives. Resolutions that are broken all too often.

Toolbox for Cycle-Friendly Junctions in Amsterdam

Publisher: 
Gemeente Amsterdam
Publication date: 
February 2017
Abstract: 

To improve the flow of cycle traffic, measures have to be taken regarding infrastructure and traffic regulations. Infrastructure measures focus on the required physical space, traffic control measures focus on the distribution of green and red times. Both types of measures obviously affect each other, but they can certainly prove their worth, in isolation.

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