cycle lanes

Geen smalle fietsstroken meer (no more narrow bicycle lanes)

Publisher: 
Fietsberaad
Publication date: 
June 2014
Abstract: 

Fietsstroken kom je in alle mogelijke varianten tegen. Er zijn ‘echte’ fietsstroken, voorzien van een fietssymbool, en fietssugges- tiestroken zonder fietssymbool. Maar ook uitwijkstroken zien er soms uit als een fietssuggestiestrook. Voor de weggebruiker is het vaak één pot nat. En wegbeheerders passen ze heel verschillend toe. Een discussienota van CROW-Fietsberaad geeft de aanzet tot meer uniformiteit in de toepassing en meer ruimte voor de fietser.

Infrastructure and Cyclist Safety (TRL Report PPR 580)

Publisher: 
TRL, DfT
Publication date: 
October 2011
Abstract: 

The Department for Transport commissioned TRL to conduct a literature review to consider the role of infrastructure in relation to the safety of cyclists and their interaction with other road users. It was undertaken as part of the wider research programme, Road User Safety and Cycling, being led by TRL. Overall, it proved problematic to draw firm conclusions from the literature.

Road safety and percieved risk of cycle tracks and lanes in Copenhagen

Publisher: 
Trafitec / City of Copenhagen
Publication date: 
May 2007
Abstract: 

A study of accidents in Copenhagen before and after an extensive network of cycle lanes and tracks was installed.

CCN Campaign for High Standards: Cycle Lanes

Publisher: 
CCN
Publication date: 
November 2000
Abstract: 

Cycle facilities and other measures to boost cycling are being introduced in Britain as never before. Government has confirmed its commitment to triple cycle use by 2010 and most local authorities across the country have some sort of pro-cycling policy with schemes on an order paper with increasing regularity.

A11 Cycle Lanes

Publisher: 
Cycling England
Publication date: 
August 2008
Abstract: 

The decision to provide cycle lanes should be reached by reference to the hierarchy of provision (Local Transport Note 2/08 Table 1.2) and such tools as the CROW derived ‘speed/flow’ diagram (see below); they should not be seen as a universal solution. Where provided, they should be a minimum of 1.5m wide, continuous, made conspicuous across side roads at junctions and not abandon cyclists where roads become narrow, for example at right turning lanes.

A12 Removal Of Road Centrelines

Publisher: 
Cycling England
Publication date: 
August 2008
Abstract: 

Consideration should be given to the removal of centrelines as an option where carriageway widths do not permit the introduction of cycle lanes of adequate width (min 1.5m) whilst retaining two general traffic lanes.

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