National

Working Together to Promote Active Travel: A briefing for local authorities

Publisher: 
Public Health England
Publication date: 
May 2016
Abstract: 

Walking and cycling are good for our physical and mental health. Switching more journeys to active travel will improve health, quality of life and the environment, and local productivity, while at the same time reducing costs to the public purse. These are substantial ‘win-wins’ that benefit individual people and the community as a whole.

Off-street trials of a Bus Stop Bypass (PPR730)

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory
Publication date: 
December 2014
Abstract: 

Designing for Walking

Publisher: 
CIHT
Publication date: 
March 2015
Abstract: 

This document explains how facilities for walking should be designed, following on from how they are planned, which is covered in “Planning for Walking”. Well-designed facilities that follow desire lines, are clutter-free, and are legible to all users will assist in enabling walking journeys and improve the experience of those already walking. The design of facilities should also consider the volumes of people walking along (actual or desired) or crossing streets, and the solutions will depend on a variety of considerations.

Does More Cycling Mean More Diversity in Cycling?

Publisher: 
Transport Reviews
Publication date: 
February 2015
Abstract: 

In low-cycling countries, cycling is not evenly distributed across genders and age groups. In the UK, men are twice as likely as women to cycle to work and cycling tends to be dominated by younger adults. By contrast, in higher cycling countries and cities, gender differences are low, absent, or in the opposite direction. Such places also lack the UK’s steady decline in cycling among those aged over 35 years. Over the past fifteen years some UK local areas have seen increases in cycling.

Adults’ attitudes towards child cycling: a study of the impact of infrastructure

Publisher: 
EJTR
Publication date: 
March 2015
Abstract: 

Research on cycle infrastructure preferences generally suggests a preference for off-road cycle infrastructure and segregation from motor traffic, among both existing cyclists and non-cyclists. However, studies have so far not explored how the presence of children might shape adults’ attitudes to cycle infrastructure. Similarly, studies on the determinants of child cycling have not as yet looked in depth at the impact of parental attitudes to specific infrastructure types.

The Merits of Segregated and Non-Segregated Traffic-Free Paths

Publisher: 
Phil Jones Associates (for Sustrans)
Publication date: 
August 2011
Abstract: 

Off street trials of a Dutch-style roundabout (PPR751)

Publisher: 
Transport Research Laboratory
Publication date: 
June 2015
Abstract: 

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