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HS2 Cycle Path Design Principles - Appendix

Publisher: 
Royal Haskoning DHV, Department for Transport
Publication date: 
February 2016

General Principles of Traffic Control by Light Signals - TAL 1/06

Publisher: 
Department for Transport
Publication date: 
March 2006
Abstract: 

The primary purpose of traffic control by light signals is to separate conflicting traffic by the division of time, within the available road space, in a safe, efficient and equitable manner. The term “traffic” includes all road users: vehicles, (including cycles), pedestrians and equestrians. Conflict at a junction is manifested as an increase in delay and/or accident rate.

At a signal-controlled junction, vehicular traffic is permitted to flow in a strictly controlled manner. The traffic flows, available road space, layout and stage

Typical Costs of Cycling Interventions: Interim analysis of Cycle City Ambition schemes

Publisher: 
Transport for Quality of Life (for the DfT
Publication date: 
September 2018
Abstract: 

This document provides a summary of typical costs of cycling interventions and the factors that affect them, drawn from expenditure during delivery of Phase 1 of the Cycle City Ambition (CCA) programme.

Sustainable Safety in the Netherlands: the vision, the implementation and the safety effects

Publisher: 
SWOV
Publication date: 
June 2005
Abstract: 

Human errors play a vital role in road crashes. This paper deals with the prevention of human errors by proper road planning, road design and improving existing roads within the framework of the Dutch 'Sustainable Safety' vision. This vision focuses on three design principles for road networks and for roads and streets: functionality, homogeneity, and predictability. A minimum safety level should be defined and agreed upon by all road authorities, national, regional, and local.

Pedestrian Comfort Guidance for London - Guidance Document

Publisher: 
Transport for London
Publication date: 
January 2010
Abstract: 

This guide and accompanying spreadsheet is aimed at anyone involved in the planning of London’s streets, whether TfL staff, local authority officers, elected members, consultants assessing the impact ofdevelopment proposals, developers, or theiragents. It is intended to ensure that the design of pedestrian footways and crossings areappropriate to the volume and type of users of that environment. The guidance is applicable whether evaluating a new design or assessing an existing footway.

What is the guide for?

Running out of road - investing in cycling in Cambridge, MIlton Keynes and Oxford

Publisher: 
National Infrastructure Commission
Publication date: 
July 2018
Abstract: 

The Cambridge – Milton Keynes – Oxford corridor is one of the fastest-growing, most productive, most innovative places in the UK. It could become Britain’s Silicon Valley. But it could also stagnate, strangled by unaffordable housing and inadequate transport.

Impacts of an active travel intervention with a cycling focus in a suburban context: One-year fi ndings from an evaluation of London’s in-progress mini-Hollands programme

Publisher: 
Science Direct
Publication date: 
June 2018
Abstract: 

Report shows that 'strong' Mini Holland' interventions generate more walking and more cycling, and don't identifiably increase traffic in surrounding areas, suggesting that providing good infra drives genuine growth in active travel.

 

Contraflow cycling

Publisher: 
Department for Transport
Publication date: 
September 1998
Abstract: 

This leaflet gives advice on the range of traffic environments and circumstances in which various options for permitting cycling in the contraflow direction in one-way streets may be appropriate.

The advice draws together guidance in existing publications from the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR) and others. It is supplemented by the results of recent research undertaken by Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) on behalf of the DETR. This is reported fully in TRL Report 358.

Inequalities in utility and leisure cycling in England, and variation by local cycling prevalence

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
July 2018
Abstract: 

This paper analyses Active People Survey data (collected 2011/12 to 2015/16) on 789,196 English adults, providing new information on how a range of socio-demographic factors are associated with utility and leisure cycling. Substantial inequalities are found in relation to gender, age, disability, and ethnicity for both types of cycling. For gender and age, and perhaps for disability in relation to recreational cycling, inequalities are moderated by local cycling prevalence such that English authorities with more cycling see less inequality.

Geen smalle fietsstroken meer (no more narrow bicycle lanes)

Publisher: 
Fietsberaad
Publication date: 
June 2014
Abstract: 

Fietsstroken kom je in alle mogelijke varianten tegen. Er zijn ‘echte’ fietsstroken, voorzien van een fietssymbool, en fietssugges- tiestroken zonder fietssymbool. Maar ook uitwijkstroken zien er soms uit als een fietssuggestiestrook. Voor de weggebruiker is het vaak één pot nat. En wegbeheerders passen ze heel verschillend toe. Een discussienota van CROW-Fietsberaad geeft de aanzet tot meer uniformiteit in de toepassing en meer ruimte voor de fietser.

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