Research paper

Better planning, better transport, better places

Publisher: 
CIHT
Publication date: 
August 2019
Abstract: 

For the last 20 years, governments have attempted to encourage a more sustainable approach to transport within spatial planning but have made limited progress.

Car parking and traffic still dominate housingdevelopments. Sustainable access to local services is poor. Sustainable approaches to transport are largely non-existent. The way we currently travel and thecontinued growth in road traffic are damaging our health,harming our towns, and contributing to climate change.

20 Good Reasons for Street Transformations in Neighbourhoods

Publisher: 
EU Metamorphosis Project
Publication date: 
April 2019
Abstract: 

The concept of roads has been around for a long time, much longer than we have had cars. In the past, the space between the houses in our cities has been used for a variety of activities and purposes, including work, entertainment, communication, as a marketplace and for transport. Of course, our streets were also the perfect place for children to develop – to play, to argue, to fraternise, to grow up, and to become better adjusted to society. This has been the case for many centuries, but the situation changed radically over the last 60 years.

Street Design in the UK - Pilot Survey

Publisher: 
Urban Design Group
Publication date: 
September 2018
Abstract: 

This survey has obtained a picture of street design and adoption practice in Great Britain. While there are some councils that have been reported to have lead, required or encouraged outstanding examples of street design, there is an underlying concern at a system level including:

  • Failures to adopt industry best practice in street design and the persistent use of outdated and questionable highway design standards dating from the 1960s or earlier.

Sharing Road Space: Drivers and Cyclists as Equal Road Users

Publisher: 
Scottish Executive Central Research Unit
Publication date: 
January 2001
Abstract: 

The Government has made a commitment to sustainable transport as part of an integrated transport strategy, encouraging a decrease in the use of cars and increasing the use of cycling as a viable mode of transport. As one element of their transportation policies, local authorities are expected to produce local cycling strategies which include the implementation of improvements to infrastructure and the initiation of traffic management measures.

Disappearing traffic? The story so far

Publisher: 
Municipal Engineer
Publication date: 
March 2002
Abstract: 

Reallocating roadspace from general traffic, to improve conditions for pedestrians or cyclists or buses or on-street light rail or other high-occupancy vehicles, is often pre- dicted to cause major traffic problems on neighbouring streets. This paper reports on two phases of research, resulting in the examination of over 70 case studies of roadspace reallocation from eleven countries, and the collation of opinions from over 200 transport professionals worldwide.

Evaluating active travel and health economic impacts of small streetscape schemes: An exploratory study in London

Publisher: 
Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: 
November 2018
Abstract: 

Introduction: This article proposes a low-cost approach that transport authorities can use to evaluate small-scale active travel interventions, including estimating health economic benefits from uptake of walking and/or cycling.

Children's independent mobility: a comparative study in England and Germany (1971-2010)

Publisher: 
Policy Studies Institute
Publication date: 
January 2013
Abstract: 

Children’s well-being and health, the quality of the environments they are brought up in and the impact of a range of social and technological developments in the lives of children has been the subject of much research, public concern and debate. This report presents new research on one factor that is affected by (and affects) these issues – children’s independent mobility. This can bedefined as ‘the freedom of children to travel around their own neighbourhood or city without adult supervision’ (Tranter and Whitelegg, 1994).

Car parking - What Works Where

Publisher: 
English Partnerships - The National Regeneration Agency
Publication date: 
March 2006
Abstract: 

This manual takes stock of common car parking treatments and reviews how successful they are in providing adequate levels of safe parking within a high quality environment. Here the introduction briefly reviews recent studies into demand, allocation and parking efficiency as a starting point for designers. It also touches on innovation, including mechanical systems, homezones and the use of travel plans such as car clubs.

Understanding attitudes to priorities at side road junctions

Publisher: 
Transportation Research
Publication date: 
January 2019
Abstract: 

Junctions are places of interaction and hence conflict for all road users. Two thirds of all collisions in built up areas occur at junctions, with pedestrians and cyclists being most at risk. The aim of the research is to investigate the attitudes to change, and likely behaviour at junctions, of all types of road users, were a general and unambiguous duty to ‘give way on turning’ to be introduced in the UK context. Q-methodology was used because it is good at capturing and describing divergent views and also consensus.

Enabling Cycling Cities - Ingredients for Success

Publisher: 
Civitas Mimosa
Publication date: 
April 2013
Abstract: 

City administrations across Europe and beyond have made real progress in planning and providing for cycling in their cities. Support both for cycling measures and this book has come from the European Commission. Their support has been most valuable, but this was not the start of their involvement. In 1999, the then European Environment Commissioner, Ritt Bjerregard wrote the following foreword to their publication ‘Cycling: The way ahead for towns and cities’:

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