Designing for Cycling in Vauxhall

Transport for London has recently released the draft strategy for cycling at the new Nine Elms development (PDF) between Vauxhall and Battersea.

It's a very well written and presented document, with plenty of examples of good infrastructure, and also examples of what to avoid.

It covers such points as 45º kerbs, the need for continuous, smooth cycle paths, good lighting to enable route use 24 hours a day, and many other considerations. By proposing these concrete, physical measures, the document escapes the vague promises which often accompany developments like this one.

The Embassy feels that this is a document which TfL should be proud of, and it should form a blueprint for all cycling projects. 

TfL are asking for comment on the strategy, so if you have anything to say about it then get in touch with them before noon on Monday the 25th of November.

It's quite a large document, so if you've spotted something we haven't (good or bad) then please leave a comment below and help inform the Embassy's response.

Comments

As you say, there is much there that is very good. Two concerns for me are 1) There isn't a map showing schools in or local to the area, to ensure they are safely accessible by bicycle (e.g. Wyvil Primary School on Wyvil Street). 2) The time scale is indeterminate for much of the area, e.g. for the Linear Park route which will be created in stages as individual building site developments are realised. Therefore it is crucial that excellent cycle infrastructure in built now into Nine Elms Lane so that as developments are completed a culture of cycling is established right from the outset.

There is no mention of children’s desire lines. On the contrary, the only mention of desire lines states: “Main roads generally follow desire lines and reflect existing travel patterns.” That is correct for commuters but certainly not for children.
For example, one would presume that many children go from school to Battersea Park in the afternoon. If the planners don’t know where the schools are, it is difficult for them to understand where the children’s desire lines are.