shopping

Town Centre Study 2011

Publisher: 
TfL
Publication date: 
September 2011

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Re-imagining urban spaces to help revitalise our high streets

Publisher: 
Department for Communities and Local Government
Publication date: 
July 2012
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Abstract: 

The Portas Review highlighted the challenges that face our high streets and town centres. With shopping habits changing, high streets need to evolve – to build on their strengths and offer a viable and exciting alternative to out-of-town and internet shopping. High streets and town centres that are fit for the 21st century need to offer a different mix of retail, services and facilities, a different style of interaction, and a variety of experiences that are about more than shopping.

Town centres and high streets have buildings and roads, but the spaces in-between are what hold them together as a place – the open spaces, streets, squares, green spaces and the network of pavements and pedestrian thoroughfares that knit them together. All too often, these spaces are used as no more than that – thoroughfares – and we start to forget that they can be so much more.

This document is aimed at anyone working to improve their high street, town centre or retail area, whether you are a neighbourhood partnership, a group of businesses, a private landowner or a local authority. Its goal is to remind us of the potential of these urban spaces, and how, with some imagination and creative thought, they can add identity to a place to help combat clone town syndrome, and help make the local high street a destination of choice.

The section at the back of this document aims to signpost some of the key documents, guidance, tools and sources of support that you may find helpful in thinking about how best to design or use the urban spaces in your area.

All sorts of good stuff about reversing the trend for our urban spaces to be terrorised by motor traffic.

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Commerce and Bicycles

Publisher: 
Thomas Krag
Publication date: 
December 2001
Abstract: 

Customers arriving by bicycle are far better than their reputation. At first they are more loyal than those who use the car for shopping, and they spend more money. In addition their share in the customer mix far exceeds the shop owners expectations.

Traffic calming and promoting the use of bicycles will have its advantages in several areas, especially in relation to the shop owners. On the other hand, the downtown shops will always compete with the suburban shopping mall for the attention of the shoppers. In other words, the two will have to settle on a certain division of labor. Downtown shops can not account for all shopping.

This division might be an disadvantage for those without access to a car as well as it will result in an increased use of car and Co2/carbon emissions. On the other hand the advocacy of bicycles and pedestrians is not synonomous with the decline of all economic activities in the city centre. The activities will merely change in their character, which in turn will result in new and different shopping experience that the malls outside of the city cannot convey

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