Safety

Psychology on the road

Publisher: 
The Psychologist
Publication date: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

Psychological perspectives on drivers and driving have been with us for since before the advent of mass motoring. The car’s unique potential to afford freedom and compromise safety has been a focus of formal psychological study for almost as long. This has resulted in a canon of excellent research, the shaping of interventions and legislation, and the saving and enhancement of lives. In seeking to prevent collisions, it has had quite an impact!

This collection of articles looks at a range of topics, including the use of neuroergonomics to improve driver safety warnings; the particular psychological issues with both younger and older drivers; how we can protect vulnerable road users such as cyclists and pedestrians; and the psychology of sustainable transport.


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The psychology of sustainable transport

Publisher: 
The Psychologist
Publication date: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

Cars contribute to local air pollution, traffic danger, congestion and poor physical health due to lack of exercise. If the final goal of sustainable development is to sustain or improve the quality of life for all, now and into the longterm future, the current growth in private car use is clearly unsustainable. Understanding why most people prefer using a car over other modes of transport for their daily travel, and how they can be persuaded to use their cars less or even abandon them altogether, is therefore an important goal for psychology.

Persuading people to use their cars less is important for cycling as transport, too!

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Young driver challenges

Publisher: 
The Psychologist
Publication date: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

It is clear that young people have the highest crash involvement of any group. What are the direct and indirect factors associated with these high crash rates? How do biological, personality, fatigue and experiential factors affect risky driving behaviours? And what potential countermeasures can be deployed?

Of possible relevance to cycling in that understanding how people drive, and what they find difficult to learn, could make a big difference to how cyclists should behave or be provided for on our roads.

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Instructions for the Completion of Road Accident Reports from non-CRASH Sources

Publisher: 
DfT
Publication date: 
September 2011
Abstract: 

The STATS20 manual provides a detailed explanation of the information, referred to as STATS19, which is the set of data which has to be collected by a Police Officer when an injury road accident is reported to them. ). It is for the use of police forces and local authorities (and their agents) where data is not collected by a police force using CRASH software.

This is the data collected when road vehicles collide.

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Shared Use Operational Review 2012

Publisher: 
Atkins / DfT
Publication date: 
May 2012
Abstract: 

Atkins was commissioned as part of a multidisciplinary project team which includes MVA Consultancy, Phil Jones Associates and TRL to carry out evidence based research into the factors which influence the design and operation of segregated and unsegregated pedestrian and cyclist shared use facilities. The research project helped inform the preparation of a new Local Transport Note on shared use routes for pedestrians and cyclists.

At the core of this research are user behavioural studies to support an understanding of how pedestrians and cyclists interact on unsegregated and segregated shared use facilities.

This technical note presents the findings of research into the factors which affect the operation and quality of shared use facilities adjacent-to-road. An evidence based approach was used to undertake comprehensive case studies in Norwich and Cambridge, supported by additional evidence from Bristol, York, Peterborough and Newcastle.


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Shared Use Routes for Pedestrians and Cyclists (LTN 1/12)

Publisher: 
DfT
Publication date: 
September 2012
Abstract: 

Shared use routes are designed to accommodate the movement of pedestrians and cyclists. Shared use schemes require careful consideration and this Local Transport Note provides advice on their planning, design and provision. It suggests a scheme development process to help in deciding if shared use is appropriate for any given situation and stresses the importance of high quality inclusive design that addresses the needs of all users. It places particular emphasis on involving users, residents, and other stakeholders in the design process.


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Evaluation of the Cycling City and Towns Programme: Qualitative Research with Residents

Publisher: 
DfT
Publication date: 
August 2012
Abstract: 

This report presents findings from qualitative research undertaken with residents of the Cycling City and Towns, during the programme period. It explores their cycling behaviour and how they responded to the investment in cycling in their local areas. By setting cycling decisions in the context of individual and family lives, and also the wider environment, the research identifies:

  • the key triggers for changes in how people choose to travel, and
  • the contextual factors which support or constrain cycling at those points – including the role of cycling schemes and interventions.

This provides new insights on cycling behavioural change for decision makers and researchers in transport and other sectors.

Of particular interest is this observation:

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Understanding Walking and Cycling: Summary of Key Findings and Recommendations

Publisher: 
Lancaster University
Publication date: 
September 2011
Abstract: 

It is widely recognized that there is a need to increase levels of active and sustainable travel in British urban areas. The Understanding Walking and Cycling (UWAC) project, funded by the EPSRC, has examined the factors influencing everyday travel decisions and proposes a series of policy measures to increase levels of walking and cycling for short trips in urban areas. A wide range of both quantitative and qualitative data were collected in four English towns (Leeds, Leicester, Worcester, Lancaster), including a questionnaire survey, analysis of the built environment, interviews and ethnographies. Key findings of the research are that whilst attitudes to walking and cycling are mostly positive or neutral, many people who would like to engage in more active travel fail to do so due to a combination of factors. These can be summarised as:

  • Concerns about the physical environment, especially with regard to safety when walking or cycling;
  • The difficulty of fitting walking and cycling into complex household routines (especially with young children);
  • The perception that walking and cycling are in some ways abnormal things to do so.

It is suggested that policies to increase levels of walking and cycling should focus not only on improving infrastructure (for instance through fully segregated cycle routes), but also must tackle broader social, economic, cultural and legal factors that currently inhibit walking and cycling. Together, such changes can create an environment in which driving for short trips in urban areas is seen as abnormal and walking or cycling seem the obvious choices.


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Healthy transport = Healthy lives

Publisher: 
BMA
Publication date: 
July 2012
Abstract: 

People have always wanted to reach destinations quickly, safely and efficiently. But as the UK transport environment has become increasingly complex, transport’s impact on health has become unnecessarily harmful - to the point where it is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality.

Our aim is to show the positive effect that integrating health into transport policy will have and we propose areas for action that prioritise health for all relevant transport sectors.

Our new report is intended for transport, energy, sustainability and climate change policy makers with strategic or operational responsibility for public health and health promotion in the UK, and will be of interest to health professionals and the public.

The BMA sings the praises of cycling and walking, and less car use, to improve the health of the nation.

They seem to have done a fair amount of work, if only reviewing literature, and the document has much to be agreed with. In particular they appear to agree with the CEoGB's view that mass cycling will not return unless motor vehicles are segregated away from people on bicycles.

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